Just one day after Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco announced the U.S. Department of Justice’s (“DOJ’s” or “Department’s”) whistleblower pilot program on March 8, 2024, the DOJ’s Criminal Division highlighted its plans to apply the program in its fight against global corruption. Specifically, the Criminal Division described its plan to apply the new whistleblower initiatives to Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) cases as part of its overarching priority of targeting the “most complex financial crimes and having the greatest possible impact on corporate conduct.”[1]Continue Reading DOJ Plans to Apply the New Whistleblower Rewards Pilot Program to FCPA Cases

While most legal conferences may not be newsworthy, the American Bar Association’s National Institute on White Collar Crime is an exception. Indeed, the federal government’s chief law enforcers seem to treat this particular conference like tech companies treat industry conventions or product launches: a one-stop press tour/coming-out party held to unveil their next big initiative or program in the presence of hundreds of eager and invested onlookers. In this case, though, the onlookers just happen to be members of the national white collar defense bar.Continue Reading DOJ Pilot Program for Whistleblower Rewards: The Latest Unveiling from the ABA’s National Institute on White Collar Crime

In a landmark unanimous ruling late last week, Murray v. UBS Securities, LLC, et al. 601 U. S. ____ (2024), the U.S. Supreme Court held that whistleblowers do not need to prove their employer acted with “retaliatory intent” to be protected under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Instead, all whistleblower plaintiffs need to prove is that their protected activity was a “contributing factor” in the employer’s unfavorable personnel action. Continue Reading U.S. Supreme Court Endorses Low Burden of Proof for Whistleblowers